Amali Amin, PhD

Nur Amali Aminnuddin

Lecturer in Islamic Studies (History, Civilisation, and Shari’ah)
Sultan Omar ‘Ali Saifuddien Centre for Islamic Studies
Universiti Brunei Darussalam

Dr Nur Amali Aminnuddin is a scholar of Islamic studies, focusing on the discipline through interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches, with emphasis on empirical methods. He employs multiple lenses in his work, primarily of theology and psychology to comprehend the complex nature of Muslims and societies in the contemporary Islamic civilisation.

 

With over 8 years of experience in academia, currently he is the Lecturer in Islamic Studies (History, Civilisation, and Shari’ah) at Sultan Omar ‘Ali Saifuddien Centre for Islamic Studies, Universiti Brunei Darussalam. Presently, he is also the Coordinator (Graduate Studies and Research) for the centre.

BACKGROUND

His research areas are within the field of psychology of religion, social/cultural/positive psychology, and behavioral sciences. He focuses on society, religion, individual, and behavior. Religion, specifically Islam, is a frequent theme in his research. A significant number of his publications concerns religion, work ethic, discrimination, and education. He had published in various prominent international journals, including Cogent Psychology, Psychological Thought, and Journal of Behavioral Science.

Presently, his research involves investigating the interplay of religion and personality in influencing various unethical behaviors, and in addition to well-being, dark triad traits, and other individual differences. Other projects that he is working on are on entrepreneurship and consumer behavior, which also overlap with personality and religiosity. He is also open to research concerning management, workplace, ethics, and human rights. Other research areas he is interested in are on young Muslims and their beliefs, and reconciliation between religion and the modern life. In sum, his works build and form a holistic understanding of Islamic civilisation in the contemporary world.

Prior to his doctorate in Brunei Studies (with a thesis on the influence of Islamic religiosity toward ethical work behavior with an emphasis on the theory of planned behaviour), he majored in political science with specialization in international relations at the undergraduate level at International Islamic University Malaysia. Then, at the master level, he did psychology, specializing in industry and organization. Currently, he is enrolled in a master’s program in Islamic finance, which will be completed soon.

Other than that, he taught core modules for undergraduates and handle other responsibilities, including administration and operation. During his PhD candidature, he was also involved with the teaching of the module Melayu Islam Beraja. He was awarded several competitive scholarships for his bachelor’s degree, master, and PhD from the government of Brunei Darussalam. Outside of the university, he is an active member of the Malaysian Psychological Association, as well as a member of the Asian Psychological Association. In the latter, he held the position of treasurer (2017-2019). He has also contributed as a reviewer for various journals, including Islamic Guidance and Counseling Journal, Psychological Thought, and Journal of Population and Social Studies.

The growing need to explore the Muslim psyche is unprecedented. We as Muslims need to understand one’s inner self and its manifestation in and toward an individual and collectively as a society. This will open the path toward taking control of the Muslim narratives in knowledge production.

The growing need to explore the Muslim psyche is unprecedented. We as Muslims need to understand one’s inner self and its manifestation in and toward an individual and collectively as a society. This will open the path toward taking control of the Muslim narratives in knowledge production.

RESEARCH INTEREST

Psychology of religion
Psychology of Islam
Religiousness
Religious experiences
Individual differences
Islamic civilisation
Religion, culture, and society

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

  • Aminnuddin, N. A., & Abd. Hamid, H. S. (2021). Predictors of deviant behavior justification among Muslims: Sociodemographic factors, subjective well-being, and perceived religiousness. Islamic Guidance and Counseling Journal, 4(2), 144-157. https://doi.org/10.25217/igcj.v4i2.1814

  • Aminnuddin, N. A. (2020). Ethnic differences and predictors of racial and religious discriminations among Malaysian Malays and Chinese. Cogent Psychology, 7(1), 1766737. https://doi.org/10.1080/23311908.2020.176673
  • Aminnuddin, N. A. (2020). Perceiving university education as more important for men than for women: Gender differences and predictors of this perception in Muslim societies. Psychological Thought, 13(1), 99-126. https://doi.org/10.37708/psyct.v13i1.392

  • Aminnuddin, N. A. (2020). Personality and Islamic religiosity: Preliminary survey data of Bruneian Malay Muslim university students and their psychological well-being, unethical behavior, and dark triad traits. Data in Brief, 30, 105486. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2020.105486