Amali Amin, PhD

Research

Enquiries

For collaborations, you can find the contact details in my CV.

Current Projects

Contemporary Muslim Religious Experiences

Principal Investigator:
Dr Nur Amali Aminnuddin

 

Co-Principal Investigator:
Dr Majdey Zawawi

 

Status:
Active

With myriads of experiences that are of interest within the context of Muslims, presently, we focus on constructs that can help us to understand the complex phenomenon of religious struggle. Aside from the phenomenon itself as the primary construct investigated, other constructs that can further deepen our understanding include religious awakening and religious degradation. We acknowledged the complex, intricate, and convoluted nature of religious experiences, barely knowing much, scratching only the surface.

 

In context, Muslims today are constantly exposed to various ideologies, cultures, values, etc. Although differences can be beneficial, contradicting ideas and values may pose challenges for Muslims. There will be, for some, a state of dissonance between these ideas/values and Islamic doctrine. This can, and may, cause distress.

 

All in all, we aim to explore religious struggle, degradation, and awakening. Instruments will be developed, and pathways constructed as models will be tested.

DEVIANT BEHAVIOR EXPERIENCES OF CONTEMPORARY MUSLIM WOMEN

Principal Investigator:
Dr Nur Amali Aminnuddin

 

Status:
Active (Starts in May 2023)

This research explores the complex picture of the challenges and opportunities faced by Muslim women in contemporary society, including their religiosity and identity. Three types of deviant behavior experiences among Muslim women will be studied: discrimination, bullying, and exclusion.

 

The proposed project will examine the demographic profiles of those experiencing high/low level of deviant behaviors. This will then be extended to identify the connection of these deviant behavior experiences with the role of positive psychological variables and outcomes.

 

By building a model to predict deviant behavior experiences among Muslim women in contemporary society, the proposed research will help to inform relevant bodies and organizations in their own respective goals, particularly in policymaking, intervention, and prevention.

THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN LANGUAGE AND RELIGION

Principal Investigator:
Dr Nur Amali Aminnuddin

 

Co-Principal Investigator:
Dr Salbrina Sharbawi

 

Status:
Active

This project aims to investigate the notion of religiosity in the Bruneian context with the overarching aim being to investigate earlier claims of a link between language and religion.

 

While Malay is the sanctioned official language and Brunei Malay traditionally acknowledged as the nation’s lingua franca, the current language situation in Brunei points to an active shift in motion with a growing preference for the use of English amongst the young Bruneians. Given that the religious domain has been most rigid in resisting English infiltration, questions are now being raised as to whether the increasing English-proclivity of the young Bruneian Malays has a direct bearing on their percept of the Muslim identity and acts of religiosity. While language use and preference are the main variable of interest, other social variables are also factored into the investigation. These variables include age, gender, educational background, and the type of schooling, and also the psychological variable of worldview.


The project will be a 2-year collaboration between SOASCIS and FASS. At SOASCIS, the team focusing on the religious aspect and research design will be led by Dr Nur Amali Aminnuddin as the PI. While at FASS, the PI for the team will be Dr Salbrina Sharbawi who will oversee the linguistic aspect.

Current Collaborations

You and the Owls

Across the world, we tend to give animals particular abilities and symbolism. The lion is the symbol of power while the eagle connects us with the Divine by flying high. These representations are widespread despite many of us having never encountered some of these animals in the wild.

 

Currently, we lack the same understanding as to how people think and feel about another animal that few of us encountered in the wild, namely owls.

 

https://you-and-the-owls.webnode.com/

 

Current stage: Done with data collection in Brunei.

Colour-Emotion Association

Which emotions do you associate with colours?

 

We often use colours and colour names to communicate about emotions (e.g. “I feel blue”). The colour research team at the University of Lausanne is doing a large multi-national study on colour-emotion association. Do people agree and to what extent does our cultural background determine how we give emotional meaning to colour words?

 

https://www2.unil.ch/onlinepsylab/colour/main.php

 

Current stage: Done with data collection in Brunei.